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old-Результаты и исследования

Disinformation trends in the Baltics: war in Ukraine, NATO presence and controversy over edible insects

During the second quarter of the year the fact-checking efforts in the three Baltic states primarily concentrated on the war in Ukraine and the spread of Russian propaganda about it. The highest level of Ukraine-related disinformation was found in Lithuania, while Latvia and Estonia saw a decline.

Non-war related conspiracies and fabricated stories about the health featured heavily in the all three Baltic states. For example, false claims emerged in Latvia and Lithuania that massive earthquakes in Syria and Turkey were deliberately induced by a US-controlled “climate weapon,” aiming to tarnish the reputation of US officials, local authorities, the United Nations, NATO and EU.

Kremlin’s propaganda in our pockets. How disinformation thrives on Telegram.

By banning Kremlin’s TV and online propaganda in the Baltics, the access to such resources has become more challenging only for those whose primary source used to be television. Now social media platforms have taken up that space, among which Telegram stands out because it does not share data with governments and does not moderate disinformation and lies.

In the Baltics, the most popular channels directed towards local Russian speakers are not having the big following in numbers, but that is not the point:  their main role is to amplify each other’s content and create the impression that many people think alike. Telegram played a particularly significant role during the beginning of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Various activists, both well-known and new, have joined forces on “Telegram” to popularise pro-Kremlin messages.

A Trend Report on Russia’s Disinformation Tactics Targeting the Baltics

The Russian invasion of Ukraine on 24 February last year has brought about a change in Russia’s long-standing efforts to influence Latvian and Baltic information spaces with disinformation.

The escalation of the war and the resulting widespread backlash against the Russian regime has reinforced the Kremlin’s need to break the current relationship in order to return to the relative normality that existed before 24 February.

At the same time, it would be wrong to claim that Russian disinformation has been fundamentally transformed in terms of messages against the background of the war, since Russia’s own foreign policy orientations have not been transformed.

But the war has provided new pretexts to try to deliver messages that have been tried and tested for years to audiences, in an attempt to adapt them to the current situation.

Is TikTok a Gateway to Politics in the Baltics? For Now, Only in Latvia

Although there is a common assumption that TikTok is used only by a younger generation, Re:Baltica’s analysis shows that in Latvia it’s a powerful tool enough for populists to get into parliament.

After shutting down Kremlin’s TV channels, TikTok has become fertile soil also for Kremlin’s narratives. Latvian State Security service has started seven criminal investigations for supporting Moscow on TikTok, while Lithuania and Estonia are taking a lighter approach.

Why so, read in Re:Baltica’s Baltic disinformation quarterly review about the use of TikTok.

Report on current issues, methodologies and needs in anti-disinformation actions

DIGIRES report provides an up-to-date analysis of actions to combat disinformation aimed at promoting the digital resilience of Lithuanian society, and proposes the idea of ​​multisectoral integration and multistakeholder partnership.

Report by: Baltic Research Foundation for Digital Resilience
Aukse Balcytiene, Darius Amilevicius, Kristina Berksun, Dmytro larovyi, leva lvanauskaite, Kristina
Juraite, Neringa Jurciukonyte, lgnas Kalpokas, Violeta KaraliOnaite, Rimgaile Kasparaite, Dominyka
Lapelyte, Epp Lauk, Patricija Lenciauskiene, Aiste Meidute, Hannu Nieminen, Ramune Ramanauskiene,
Darius Remeika, JO rate Ruzaite, Brigita Sabaliauskaite, Aiste TurcinaviciOte, Andrius Utka.

Whether their goal is to amass a following, oppose environmentally friendly policies, or resist what they perceive as “totalitarian global control”, a diverse group of disinformation spreaders has shifted its focus to the topic of climate change. This report provides an overview of how climate misinformation is disseminated in the Baltic States, shedding light on the tactics and actors involved in spreading false or misleading information on the topic of climate change.

First report_EDMO_kujundus

 

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine on February 24th last year has altered its longstanding efforts to influence the information landscape of Latvia and the Baltic States through disinformation campaigns. This report highlights the central themes in these campaigns, ranging from accusations of widespread Russophobia to portrayals of Western countries as intellectual concentration camps. These narratives serve the Kremlin’s objectives of influencing public opinion and advancing its interests in the region.

Second report_EDMO_kujundus

In the wake of Russia’s ongoing invasion of Ukraine, pro-Kremlin disinformation campaigns have intensified their efforts to influence narratives in the Baltic States, particularly Latvia. These campaigns exploit a variety of themes to cast Russia as the victim and portray Latvia’s actions as hostile. A recurring theme is Latvia’s alleged subservience to Western countries and their policies, as well as its perceived role in fueling Russophobia and nationalism. This report delves into these narratives, highlighting their core elements and objectives while providing a comprehensive overview of the disinformation tactics employed.

climatechangereport_kujundus

old-Результаты и исследования

Disinformation trends in the Baltics: war in Ukraine, NATO presence and controversy over edible insects

During the second quarter of the year the fact-checking efforts in the three Baltic states primarily concentrated on the war in Ukraine and the spread of Russian propaganda about it. The highest level of Ukraine-related disinformation was found in Lithuania, while Latvia and Estonia saw a decline.

Non-war related conspiracies and fabricated stories about the health featured heavily in the all three Baltic states. For example, false claims emerged in Latvia and Lithuania that massive earthquakes in Syria and Turkey were deliberately induced by a US-controlled “climate weapon,” aiming to tarnish the reputation of US officials, local authorities, the United Nations, NATO and EU.

Kremlin’s propaganda in our pockets. How disinformation thrives on Telegram.

By banning Kremlin’s TV and online propaganda in the Baltics, the access to such resources has become more challenging only for those whose primary source used to be television. Now social media platforms have taken up that space, among which Telegram stands out because it does not share data with governments and does not moderate disinformation and lies.

In the Baltics, the most popular channels directed towards local Russian speakers are not having the big following in numbers, but that is not the point:  their main role is to amplify each other’s content and create the impression that many people think alike. Telegram played a particularly significant role during the beginning of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Various activists, both well-known and new, have joined forces on “Telegram” to popularise pro-Kremlin messages.

A Trend Report on Russia’s Disinformation Tactics Targeting the Baltics

The Russian invasion of Ukraine on 24 February last year has brought about a change in Russia’s long-standing efforts to influence Latvian and Baltic information spaces with disinformation.

The escalation of the war and the resulting widespread backlash against the Russian regime has reinforced the Kremlin’s need to break the current relationship in order to return to the relative normality that existed before 24 February.

At the same time, it would be wrong to claim that Russian disinformation has been fundamentally transformed in terms of messages against the background of the war, since Russia’s own foreign policy orientations have not been transformed.

But the war has provided new pretexts to try to deliver messages that have been tried and tested for years to audiences, in an attempt to adapt them to the current situation.

Is TikTok a Gateway to Politics in the Baltics? For Now, Only in Latvia

Although there is a common assumption that TikTok is used only by a younger generation, Re:Baltica’s analysis shows that in Latvia it’s a powerful tool enough for populists to get into parliament.

After shutting down Kremlin’s TV channels, TikTok has become fertile soil also for Kremlin’s narratives. Latvian State Security service has started seven criminal investigations for supporting Moscow on TikTok, while Lithuania and Estonia are taking a lighter approach.

Why so, read in Re:Baltica’s Baltic disinformation quarterly review about the use of TikTok.

Report on current issues, methodologies and needs in anti-disinformation actions

DIGIRES report provides an up-to-date analysis of actions to combat disinformation aimed at promoting the digital resilience of Lithuanian society, and proposes the idea of ​​multisectoral integration and multistakeholder partnership.

Report by: Baltic Research Foundation for Digital Resilience
Aukse Balcytiene, Darius Amilevicius, Kristina Berksun, Dmytro larovyi, leva lvanauskaite, Kristina
Juraite, Neringa Jurciukonyte, lgnas Kalpokas, Violeta KaraliOnaite, Rimgaile Kasparaite, Dominyka
Lapelyte, Epp Lauk, Patricija Lenciauskiene, Aiste Meidute, Hannu Nieminen, Ramune Ramanauskiene,
Darius Remeika, JO rate Ruzaite, Brigita Sabaliauskaite, Aiste TurcinaviciOte, Andrius Utka.

Whether their goal is to amass a following, oppose environmentally friendly policies, or resist what they perceive as “totalitarian global control”, a diverse group of disinformation spreaders has shifted its focus to the topic of climate change. This report provides an overview of how climate misinformation is disseminated in the Baltic States, shedding light on the tactics and actors involved in spreading false or misleading information on the topic of climate change.

First report_EDMO_kujundus

 

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine on February 24th last year has altered its longstanding efforts to influence the information landscape of Latvia and the Baltic States through disinformation campaigns. This report highlights the central themes in these campaigns, ranging from accusations of widespread Russophobia to portrayals of Western countries as intellectual concentration camps. These narratives serve the Kremlin’s objectives of influencing public opinion and advancing its interests in the region.

Second report_EDMO_kujundus

In the wake of Russia’s ongoing invasion of Ukraine, pro-Kremlin disinformation campaigns have intensified their efforts to influence narratives in the Baltic States, particularly Latvia. These campaigns exploit a variety of themes to cast Russia as the victim and portray Latvia’s actions as hostile. A recurring theme is Latvia’s alleged subservience to Western countries and their policies, as well as its perceived role in fueling Russophobia and nationalism. This report delves into these narratives, highlighting their core elements and objectives while providing a comprehensive overview of the disinformation tactics employed.

climatechangereport_kujundus

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